Increasing the Stroke Rate

 In News

The question is, how to modify the Pocock stroke to make it more modern and to allow the crew to race at 38 strokes per minute?

There are a few measures that you can do to increase the stroke rate:

  1. Carry the blade about 2 inches off the water.
  2. Maintain an even, smooth around the release and follow through
  3. Start the trunk out of bow when the trunk goes through the perpendicular (sooner).
  4. Just past the perpendicular at the release with the trunk. Shorter stroke.
  5. Slightly less trunk lean at the entry. More level shoulders.
  6. The single piece drive, integral makes for a faster seat movement in place of the legs , trunk, arms sequence.
  7. Using the trunk swing on the recovery covers the distance faster than setting the angle.
  8. More use of the arms throughout the stroke makes for a quicker movement.
  9. Improving the coordination of the motions throughout the cycle will produce greater efficiency and time saving especially during the transition phases at each end of the slide.
  10. You have to use small muscle skills with the entry and release inside a simple pattern.
    • Contemporary scullers are using large muscle system in a complex movement pattern. The pattern uses three motions, square, place, pull in place of place and pull for the entry. For the release, it is out square, feather, recover and with the sculler’s stroke it is release to 45 degrees, recover. Simpler system and use smaller muscles, the fingers. Robert Pearce used to spin the handles at each end of the track with the wrists perfectly flat. This could be one of the sources of problems for the conventional folks, wrong peg in the wrong hole.
  11. In sweep rowing keep the trunk and head centered over the keel. So with a narrow rig and only a slightly bent inside arm, you are pulling with both arms and shoulders fully. This provides more connection between the athletes and consequently, more Flow which saves time.

Well their it is, my humble contribution. The sculler and coach have to visualize and think differently.

James C. Joy
Over his long career as athlete, coach, teacher and mentor, Jimmy has touched directly and indirectly thousands in the rowing community. From novices to national, world and Olympic champions, and for coaches at many levels, all have benefited from his holistic and technical approach to a cyclical non-fragmented stroke where there is a strong bond between body, shell and the water creating a state of flow within an integrated whole.
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